Tomcat webserver or appserver?

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Tomcat webserver or appserver?

raja buddha



Hi all.
I am new to appache. I wanted to know where tomcat  is webserver or
appserver
Raju

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Re: Tomcat webserver or appserver?

markt
raja buddha wrote:
> I am new to appache. I wanted to know where tomcat  is webserver or
> appserver

Apache Tomcat is a Servlet container. Servlet containers can also server
static resources (ie act as a web server).

An app server in the J2EE sense usually means a Servlet container
combined with EJB container.

Mark

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RE: Tomcat webserver or appserver?

Richard M
In reply to this post by raja buddha
raja buddha <mailto:[hidden email]> scribbled on Saturday, May
21, 2005 3:07 PM:
> Hi all.
> I am new to appache. I wanted to know where tomcat  is webserver or
> appserver Raju

Just to be clear, the Apache HTTP Web server (http://httpd.apache.org)
is different than the Tomcat Java web application server
(http://jakarta.apache.org/tomcat).

Tomcat started as primarily a Java application server with basic HTTP
server support. Today it offers pretty complete and sophisticated web
server support - although not as complete as the standard Apache web
server.

As an application server, Tomcat does not support ALL of the J2EE spec,
just the parts necessary for what are often called "web applications" -
those primarily using servlet and JSP technologies with underlying
database access. For example, you cannot deploy Enterprise Java Beans
(Session beans or Entity beans) on Tomcat - but, IMHO, these are only
needed for the largest and more sophisticated enterprise applications.
The vast majority of web applications and web sites can run on Tomcat.
If you really need EJB support you can look at Jboss, WebSphere, BEA or
one of the other J2EE application servers. BTW, JBoss embeds a copy of
Tomcat as its JSP/Servlet engine.

Also, as a standard web (HTTP) server, Tomcat has basic support for CGI
and some level of support for PHP (seach the archive for this list).
Tomcat does not support the myriad of plugins, extension and "modules"
that Apache or some of the other web servers do. Still most sites can
easily be supported by Tomcat and the newer versions are very, very
close in terms of performance for serving straight HTML pages.

HTH - Richard


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RE: Tomcat webserver or appserver?

raja buddha
In reply to this post by raja buddha
Thanks a lot

Prem....

>From: "Richard Mixon (qwest)" <[hidden email]>
>Reply-To: "Tomcat Users List" <[hidden email]>
>To: "'Tomcat Users List'" <[hidden email]>
>Subject: RE: Tomcat webserver or appserver?
>Date: Sat, 21 May 2005 15:32:31 -0700
>
>raja buddha <mailto:[hidden email]> scribbled on Saturday, May
>21, 2005 3:07 PM:
> > Hi all.
> > I am new to appache. I wanted to know where tomcat  is webserver or
> > appserver Raju
>
>Just to be clear, the Apache HTTP Web server (http://httpd.apache.org)
>is different than the Tomcat Java web application server
>(http://jakarta.apache.org/tomcat).
>
>Tomcat started as primarily a Java application server with basic HTTP
>server support. Today it offers pretty complete and sophisticated web
>server support - although not as complete as the standard Apache web
>server.
>
>As an application server, Tomcat does not support ALL of the J2EE spec,
>just the parts necessary for what are often called "web applications" -
>those primarily using servlet and JSP technologies with underlying
>database access. For example, you cannot deploy Enterprise Java Beans
>(Session beans or Entity beans) on Tomcat - but, IMHO, these are only
>needed for the largest and more sophisticated enterprise applications.
>The vast majority of web applications and web sites can run on Tomcat.
>If you really need EJB support you can look at Jboss, WebSphere, BEA or
>one of the other J2EE application servers. BTW, JBoss embeds a copy of
>Tomcat as its JSP/Servlet engine.
>
>Also, as a standard web (HTTP) server, Tomcat has basic support for CGI
>and some level of support for PHP (seach the archive for this list).
>Tomcat does not support the myriad of plugins, extension and "modules"
>that Apache or some of the other web servers do. Still most sites can
>easily be supported by Tomcat and the newer versions are very, very
>close in terms of performance for serving straight HTML pages.
>
>HTH - Richard
>
>
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>For additional commands, e-mail: [hidden email]
>

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